Category Archives: Little Walter

Remixed blues songs Little Walter Rhythm and Blues hit “Up The Line”

Little Walter’s music is good material for a remix. His biggest Hit “My Babe”, has earlier been remixed successfully by JPOD and other DJ’s. Recently I walked into another great remixed blues song of the blues harmonica king. I share with you Little Walter’s “Up The Line”, which was remixed by Catalist and featured on the Electro-Blues Vol.2 album.  

Electro Blues Vol. 2 Album

Electro Blues vol 2. was released by Freshly Squeezed Music, and is full of danceable songs of artists like Freddie King, Etta James, Wynonie Harris and Amos Milburn.  Freshly Squeezed Music is a British independent record label and music publisher.  The Label is currently sitting atop Europe’s  booming electro swing scene, 

Little Walter “Up The Line”

Little Walter’s “Up The Line”, is a song that in its original version would fit in every dance hall today. The driving sax, melodic harmonica and grooving piano really make this song. On top, we add the soulful vocals of Walter and you’ve got it all!

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Classic Blues Songs and Traditional: Goin’ Down Slow

Classic Blues Songs and Traditional: Goin’ Down Slow


Some blues songs contributed so much to the history of blues and music that the can be named classic songs, or even a traditional. A few musicians have that honour. One of them is St. Louis Jimmy Oden. Goin’ Down Slow’ written by his hand in 1941 is covered over a forty times, and in my opinion it would still be a hit.

This November it rained so hard you wouldn’t think about goin´ out on the street. And yeah there was I walking to the city centre. Muddy Waters, best recordings was on headphone. The song: Goin’ Down Slow. It was what you can call right song on the right time. Wet from the rain, and cold from the wind. After Muddy version was finished. I searched for more versions while freezing my hands of. Wolf, Walter, Dupree, Charles and Sonny Terry’s Goin’ Down Slow made that terrible walk a pleasure. I searched around and found a whole lot of covers of Oden’s Masterpiece. Some of old dogs in blues, also a lot of new bluesman.

The Original: St. Louis Jimmy Oden Blues composer

St. Louis Jimmy Oden was a profilic composer from St. Louis alongside Roosevelt Sykes, Oden travelled throughout the south, mid-west and eventually settled in Chicago. Those days piano and guitar teams where popular around St. Louis. Odin recorded Goin’ Down Slow on November 11, 1941, and was issued on Bluebird records that year.

Other recording Goin’ Down Slow

More than forty times this traditional blues song had been recorded. Champion Jack Dupree, Roosevelt Sykes and Ray Charles where the first musicians to cover Oden’s hit. Almost every recording of Goin’ Down Slow stays close to the original. Howlin’ Wolf however, slightly changed some of the lyrics with the help of Willie Dixon. Wolf and Dixon made a greet dialog song of Goin’ Down Slow. How life for a man slowly slips away. Especially this rhyme:

“Man, you know I done enjoyed things
That Kings and Queens will never have
In fact, Kings and Queens can never get
And they don’t even know about it and good times?”

Howlin’ Wolf – Goin’ Down Slow

The bluesman who dominated the scene for a whole lot of years Howlin’ Wolf recorded Goin’ Down Slow in 1961 for Chess Record. His version is the grittiest, darkest and baddest of all, and therefore maybe the best. You would think It was written for Howlin’ Wolf. Willie Dixon added a few lyrics to the song.

“Now looky here, I did not say I was a millionaire
But I said I have spent more money than a millionaire
‘Cause if I had kept all of the money I done already spent
I would’ve been a millionaire, a long time ago
And women? Great googly moogly”

Little Walter – Goin’ Down Slow

Especially the intro of Walter’s Goin’ Down Slow is amazing, this true electric version is like a opera. Walter really creates the tradegy of the song, and makes it a real blues hit. The electric guitar part is deep and leading in this song. You wouldn’t expect such a leading guitar part in a Little Walter song.

Cousin Joe – Goin’ Down Slow

Down in New Orleans Cousin Joe recorded Goin’ Down Slow in 1994 on his Bad Luck Blues Album. Like you would expect from Cousin Joe the piano is a bit groovy, but Joe’s voice is the key to listening to this song. Joe preaches slow.

Sonny Terry & Brownie MC Ghee – Goin’ Down Slow

Like you would expect from Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee they turn this blues traditional into a Delta Folk mixer. Like most of the versions Goin’ Down Slow is a slow song, but Sonny adds with his harmonica a whole lotta groove into the composition.

BB King – Goin’ Down Slow

One of the few who make this Goin’ Down Slow a groovy rhythm full song is BB King. Especially the ongoing beat makes this song. But BB soulful voice is absolute fantastic.

After listening to al the version of Jimmy Oden’s masterpiece I really favoured the versions of Wolf and Walter. A few weeks later BB King was the man to listen to. There aren’t that many songs that have been recorded so many times, and that is a great thing about this song. You will change your favourite version a couple of time. But the song never changes.

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Buddy Guy Birthday blues blog

I’ve never missed a gig yet. Music makes people happy, and that’s why I go on doing it – I like to see everybody smile.
– Buddy Guy –

Buddy Guy 77 years

Young dogs grow old! Buddy Guy the famous bluesguitar master has become 77 years today. To honor this legend A Black Bull Blues blues blog for buddy. What I like about the Chicago representative is the youth in his voice and music. In contrast to Muddy Waters or Howlin’Wolf with whom Buddy played together since the fifties is that buddy always kept a kind of youth in his voice. For exemple Slop Around or First time I Met The Blues.

Legendary BluesGuitarist

Buddy Guy (born George Guy, July 30, 1936 in Lettsworth, Louisiana) is an American blues music and rock music guitarist, as well as a singer. Known as an inspiration to Jimi Hendrix and other 1960s blues and rock legends, Guy is considered as an important proponent of chicago blues made famous by Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. He has influenced both widely known and local blues guitarists.

Super Blues Band

Buddy Guy Blues blog Chicago
Buddy Guy in 1998

My father once gave me a blues record super blues band. It contains music of Muddy Waters, Howlin´ Wolf and Bo Diddley. He Told me the guy that plays Bass is also very good. I didn´t knew who Willy dixon was, but it wasn´t Willy it was Buddy Guy. Buddy Guy did not play bass on every track, but i´ve been told that on some songs buddy grabbed that bassguitar.

Buddy Guy Chicago Blues Guitar

Guy grew up in Louisiana where he learned to play guitar. In the early 1950s he began performing with bands in Baton Rouge. Soon after moving to Chicago in 1957, Guy fell under the influence of “Mighty”Muddy Waters. In 1958 he won a record contract with Artistic Records after beating the West Side guitarists Magic Sam and Otis Rush in a “Head Cutting Contest” at the Blue Flame Club. Soon afterwards he recorded for the Cobra label.

Religious experience

Another story ´bout buddy. A friend wen´t to the North Sea Jazz Festival in Rotterdam the Netherlands. Quitte funny thing most times. But that particular year it was buddy who made the show. Buddy Was fantastic, walk through the audience, let ecerybody rock and made impression with his guitar style. How my friend discribed it “ A religious experience”.

Why did they keep changing guitars and amplifiers when they were perfect? They did the same things with cars, if you ask me. They forgot how to make them right, because they focused on style and bells and whistles.
– Buddy Guy –


 

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Blues song Hoochie Coochie Man

Released in 1954 by Chess Records.

Hoochie Coochie Man was written by Willy Dixon and played by Muddy Waters for the first time in 1954. This record is considered one of the most important songs in blues history. And therefore, a reason to write about it on Black Bull Blues.

Awards

When Hoochie Coochie Man was released it reached the #8 position on the Black Singles Chart in 1954. In 1998 the song was awarded with the Grammy Hall Of Fame award. Hoochie Coochie Man is also featured on the Rolling Stone Magazine list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.

Hoochie Coochie

According to Wikipedia Hoochie Coochie was a provocative dance that became widly popular during, and after, the Chicago World Fair in 1893. Since the dance was performed by women, a hoochie coochie man “either” watched them or ran the show. Alternatively, from the directly sexual meaning of hoochie coochie, he greatly enjoyed sexual intercourse.

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The Black Bull Blues of Little Walter

Little Walter | Marion Walter Jacobs (May 1, 1930)

Little Walter I would’ve liked to have played with  / Johnny Winter

The Swinging Harp

The first time I heard about Little Walter was in the movie Cadillac Recods. I was a nineteen year old boy who just invented some blues greats like Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and John Lee Hooker. The first song that got my attention, and I’m sure many more Little Walter enthusiasts, was ‘My Babe’.  Everytime I hear that swinging harp and Guitar, it gives me a relaxing groove. Walters voice is one of a kind, that is what makes his music great.

Traveling

Little walter was born in Marksville, Louisiana. At age of twelve he dropped out of school, he would travel around, walking the streets of New Orleans, Memphis, Helena and St. Louis.

Chicago

When Little Walter arrived in Chicago he started playing music on Maxwell Street. A famous place for Chicago blues musicians, back in the day. Not only Walter but also many more Chicago legends made fame on Maxwell Street.  Among Little Walter artist like Floyd Jones, Big Bill Broonzy and Sonny Boy Williamson played there tunes on Maxwell Street.

Little Walter´s Music  

From now on it is possible to listen to some Blues records on the Black Bull Blues Blog. With Amazon musicplayer I can give an impression of the music I’m talking ’bout. Enjoy the famous Little Walter Tracks.

Death

A few months after returning from his second European tour, he was involved in a fight while taking a break from a performance at a nightclub on the South Side of Chicago. The relatively minor injuries sustained in this altercation aggravated and compounded damage he had suffered in previous violent encounters, and he died in his sleep at the apartment of a girlfriend at 209 E. 54th St. in Chicago early the following morning.

Grave

His body was buried at St. Mary’s Cemetery inEvergreen Park, IL on February 22, 1968. His grave remained unmarked until 1991, when fans Scott Dirks and Eomot Rasun had a marker designed and installed
 

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