Tag Archives: Sonny Boy Williamson

Billy Boy Arnold’s Legacy as a Chicago Blues harpist

Billy Boy Arnold’s Legacy as a Chicago Blues harpist

In the Chicago blues scene of the 1950s Billy Boy Arnold  was doing a whole lot of recordings. He learned harp from Sonny Boy ‘John Lee’ Williamson just before Williamson’s death. He worked in his uncle’s store during those days and Williamson lived close.

As a teenager he debuted at the Cool label with the song “Hello Stranger” in 1952.  A few years later he was part of the Bo Diddley band that recorded ‘I’m A Man’ for Checker records. As a solo musician for Veejay he recorded songs like I Wish You Would” and “I Ain’t Got You”. But Billy Boy Arnold never reached the fame other Chicago bluesman around had. Nevertheless, the bluesman who was born and raised in Chicago recorded some of the finest  Rhythm ‘nd Blues songs.

Learning harmonica from Sonny Boy Williamson I

In an interview with L. “Chicago Beau” Beauchamp Billy Boy Arnold explained how the blues came to him. “Billy Boy Arnold’ s father, mother, sisters and grandparents all like and listened to the blues, so for Billy Boy the blues was the music he had to play. In his teenage years Arnold had a job in his uncle’s Butcher Shop, he learned Sonny Boy lived close and one day a man with a guitar around his neck, probably Lazy Bill Lucas walked by. Billy asked the men if he knew where Sonny Boy lived, the bluesman knew Sonny’s address and with his cousin Archie, Billy Boy went to 3226 South Giles and rang the bell. The blues master openened the door and said “Can I help you?”. Billy wanted to learn harmonica, Sonny boy said “Come on up, I’m proud to have you”.” (BluesSpeak: The Best of the Original Chicago Blues Annual, by Lincoln T. Beauchamp)

“A week later Billy returned to Sonny Boy’s house, he hadn’t improved his harmonica skills much. Sonny Boy thought Billy Boy came by to trade comics, because Williamson traded comics with a lot kids in the neighborhood. Billy Boy made clear he came around for harmonica lessons, the old master showed the kid how to play.” Sonny Boy Williamson was a really optimistic guy, Happy Go Lucky. (BluesSpeak: The Best of the Original Chicago Blues Annual, by Lincoln T. Beauchamp)

Sonny Boy´s Death and performing with Bo Diddley

One day in 1948, Yank Rachell tells, Sonny Boy Williamson stepped out of a cab on his way home, some other guys on the street jumped on Sonny Boy, knocked him down and robbed his money. Sonny Boy “John Lee” Williamson wouldn’t survive the robbery. Billy Boy Arnold lost his teacher but would go on. The Maxwell street market was a popular place for Blues Musicians. Earl Hooker, Muddy Waters and Little Walter all performed there. Billy Boy Arnold met Bo Diddley at the market, they started playing blues together. In 1955 Billy Boy was part of the band that recorded “I’m a Man for Checker records.

Billy Boy Arnold at Vee Jay Records

Billy Boy Arnold believed Leonard Chess didn´t like him, so he signed with Veejay Records . At Veejay Records he released songs like `I Wish You Would` and ´I Ain´t Got You´, here Billy Boy Arnold came to his best Rhythm ‘nd Blues songs. The songs were catchy Rhythmic and easy listenable. Maybe inspired by Bo Diddley but probably by his own feeling Billy Recorded some of the finest tunes around. Listen also to “Rockin’Itis”.

`I Wish You Would`

´I Ain´t Got You´

“Rockin’ Itis”

The late Sixties blues

After releasing the ‘More Blues From The South Side’ album the opportunities dried up which led to a small goodbye to the artist life. Billy Boy took jobs as a bus driver and even became a parole officer.

Billy Boy Arnold at Alligator Records

In 1992 Billy Boy made his come back at Alligator Records with the album BACK WHERE I BELONG. We would see a new Arnold with a repertoire containing more classic blues songs like ‘Fine Young Girl’ . Also ‘Whiskey Beer and Reefer’ is a traditional blues song. Alligator writes about this album: “the combination of Delta-influenced blues with a more urban sophistication not only defines Arnold’s sound, but was also a significant contribution in the early, formative days of rock and roll”. ELDORADO CADILLAC’s was the next album recorded for Alligator. Billy Boy Arnold was like R.L. Burnside and T. Model Ford back on top of business during the nineties.

The great Chicago Billy Boy Arnold can look back at a career that lasts more than sixty years. He plays blues and Rhythm and Blues. He recorded for a whole lot of record labels. The music and legacy of this blues master is worth and ode.

photo credit: Billy Boy Arnold@Mojo Workin’ 2014 via photopin (license)

Billy Boy Arnold Plays Sonny Boy Williamson

Billy Boy Arnold Back Where I Belong

Billy Boy Arnold – Oh! Me! Oh! My! Blues

From Bruce DiMattia – An interview with bluesman, Billy Boy Arnold, world famous blues vocalist, harmonica player and song writer, at the Chicago Blues Festival, June 1992.

An interview with Billy Boy Arnold, June 1992 from Bruce DiMattia on Vimeo.

Shake that Boogie

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Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson a career of Blues, Rock ‘n Roll and Rhythm ‘nd Blues

Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson a career of Blues, Rock ‘n Roll and Rhythm ‘nd Blues

Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson has done it all. The piano player and singer recorded infectious music in a wide range from Rhythm and Blues to Rock ‘n Roll to Rockabilly, Blues and Gospel. You may know him for his 1955 hit record “Red Hot”, which was later covered by Elvis Presley and Billy Lee Riley. But Billy ‘The Kid’ has recorded way more songs in his long career, which led to collaborations with the greatest musicians in Blues and Rock ‘n Roll.

Born in Tarpon Springs, Florida Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson learned the piano at a young age. He joined several local bands before he entered the United States Navy. After World War II Billy Emerson continued performing in the Florida area, where he picked up his nickname “The Kid”. According to Sun Records “He picked up his nickname while playing a joint in St. Petersburg; the club owner dressed the band up in cowboy duds that begged comparison with a certain murderous outlaw.

Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson’ Sun records Days

After Billy Emerson met Ike Turner, while he was stationed in Memphis he became part of Turner’s Rhythm Kings. Turner introduced Emerson to the Sun Record label which led, in 1954 to ‘Billy the Kid’s first single called “No Teasing Around”. Billy Emerson became an important writer for Sun record. his repertoire consisted of a variety of Blues and Rhythm ‘n Blues songs like ‘When it Rains it Really Pours’. He became a popular musician in the Rock ‘n Roll and Rockabilly scene which inspired Elvis Presley, Billy Lee Riley for Sun and Bob Luma to re-record Emerson’s greatest hits.

Billy ‘The Kid’ Emerson for Vee-jay Records

Billy Emerson’ last recording for Sun “Little Fine Healthy Thing” failed to sell, Emerson exited Sun to sign with Chicago’s Vee-Jay Records in late 1955. Sun Records recalls: “Despite first-rate offerings such as the jumping “Every Woman I Know (Crazy ‘Bout Automobiles)” and a sophisticated “Don’t Start Me to Lying,” national recognition eluded Emerson at Vee-Jay too”.

At Vee-Jay Record Billy Emerson’s style became more Blues, more Rhythm ‘n Blues, nevertheless his song would stay as catchy as in the Sun period. For example the hit ‘Crazy ‘Bout Automobiles’, consist steady drums a groovy horn ensemble and a twisting saxophone solo. Above all there is room for the swinging vocals of Billy ‘the Kid’ Emerson.

Chess Records period

After a few years at Vee-Jay the recordings continued at Chess Records in 1958. Along his first few singles was “Woodchuck”. Emerson recorded this song earlier at Sun Records. The Chicago version, is much bluesy more singing, less talking. Another song from the Chess period is ‘Holy Mackerel Baby’, in this song Emerson tried a style of singing I haven’t heard before. Clean, no shouting, no gritty of raw-edge.

Woodchuck at Chess
Woodchuck at SunHoly Mackerel Baby’

Own Label Tarpon and collaborations with the biggest bluesman

After recording for some of the largest labels in Blues and Rock ‘n Roll around the USA, Emerson decided to start his own label called Tarpon in 1966. In addition to Emerson’s own stuff, Tarpon issued Denise LaSalle’s debut single. He continued performing with the Biggest Bluesman like Willie Dixon, Junior Wells, Buddy Guy, Earl Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson II. Billy ‘The Kid’ had an impressive career which led him to musical styles in the broad land of Roots Music.

Photo Credit feature picture: By Lioneldecoster (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Billy (The Kid) Emerson – Move Baby Move

Billy (The Kid) Emerson – every woman i know

 

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Big Joe Williams 9-string blues guitar

Big Joe Williams 9-string blues guitar

The Blues has a long history throughout the twentieth century, the Juke Joints, the Cottonfields, the Chicago clubs, the European festivals and the Chitlin’ circuit are just a small part of it. Some artist have seen it all,  and Big Joe Williams is one of them. He was there during the depression, during WW II, the post war era and the revival in the sixties. Maybe it was because he played a nine-string guitar? But probably because he was unique. Continue reading Big Joe Williams 9-string blues guitar

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Snooky Pryor from Mississippi to Chicago

Snooky Pryor from Mississippi to Chicago

Snooky Pryor was born in Lambert Mississippi 1921 and became a legend when he moved to Chicago, a great singer and harmonica player.

He started playing the harp at age of fourteen alongside childhood friend Jimmy Rogers. He listened to local musicians, the Radioshow King Biscuit Time broadcasted from Helena Arkansas. John Lee “Sonny Boy” Williamson learned Snooky how to play the Harmonica when he moved to Chicago.

Continue reading Snooky Pryor from Mississippi to Chicago

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Kitty Daisy and Lewis New Blues Blog

Blues music-Kitty_daisy_lewis_bestival_2006
Blues music-Kitty_daisy_lewis_bestival_2006

This one day, it was a summerday in 2008 I sat outside a bar in my hometown Rotterdam and thought about visiting a concert, there are plenty of music festivals during that time. The thing is a lot of bluesdogs passed away over the years. So my dream to see Junior Wells or Johnny Copeland has been dead and gone for many years. I had to attent at a concert of young musicians.

Blues legacy

Johnny Copeland’s daughter Shemekia Copeland made quite a career as a bluesartist. She was nominated for a Blues Music Award this year, and received the crown as Queen of the Blues. Mud Morganfield is busy continuing his fathers legacy. So this day in 2008 I heard these folks play “I Got My Mojo Working” and it made quite an impression. They swinged, grooved, and sounded like an old chess recording, one room filled with bluesmusicians having fun, but then fifty years later. I found some new music.

Kitty Daisy and Lewis

I heard these two girls sing and swing, It was great. So I ask the bartender the name of these guys. He picked up some coasters and wrote  Kitty, Daisy and Lewis on it. Kitty, Daisy and Lewis are three siblings of the Durham family. They play swinging blues rock ‘n roll with a Hawaiian flavor. It is music for the summer, it is the blues through sunglasses. The song I heard was a Muddy Waters classic, a 1956 song written by Preston Foster and first recorded by Ann Cole.

I got my Mojo Working Blues song

When I got home that day I searched around and found my favorite song “Going Up The Country” a cover from Canned Heat and a traditional.

Another song I really like is “Polly Put The Kettle On”, a cover of an old English language nursery rhyme. The song was transformed into a Blues song By Sonny Boy Williamson I in the 1940s, and later also covered by Big Walter Horton. And now I heard Kitty Daisy and Lewis played it. I haven’t heard a groovier version of it since then.

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